HOLLYWOOD WALK OF FAME

 

 

CHEVY CHASE

Cornelius Crane "Chevy" Chase (/ˈtʃɛvi/; born October 8, 1943) is an American actor, writer, comedian and producer. Born into a prominent New York family, he worked a plethora of strange jobs before moving into comedy and began acting with National Lampoon. He immediately became a key cast member in the debut season of Saturday Night Live, where his recurring Weekend Update segment soon became a staple of the show.

 

Chase is well known for his portrayal of the character Clark Griswold in five National Lampoon's Vacation films, and for his roles in comedies including Foul Play (1978), Caddyshack (1980), Seems Like Old Times (1980), Fletch (1985), Spies Like Us (1985), and ¡Three Amigos! (1986). He has hosted the Academy Awards twice (1987 and 1988) and briefly had his own late-night talk show, The Chevy Chase Show. He became a regular cast member as the character Pierce Hawthorne on the NBC comedy series Community, which began in 2009, though he left the show in 2012 after filming most of the episodes of the fourth season.

 

Family

Chase was born in Lower Manhattan, New York, and was raised in Woodstock, New York. His father, Edward Tinsley "Ned" Chase, was a prominent Manhattan book editor and magazine writer. His mother, Cathalene Parker (née Browning), a concert pianist and librettist, was the daughter of Admiral Miles Browning, who most notably served as Rear Admiral Raymond A. Spruance's Chief of Staff on the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) at the Battle of Midway in World War II; she was adopted as a child by her stepfather, Cornelius Vanderbilt Crane, heir to The Crane Company, and took the name Cathalene Crane. Chase's paternal grandfather was artist/illustrator Edward Leigh Chase, and his great-uncle was painter/teacher Frank Swift Chase. His maternal grandmother, Cathalene (Parker), was an opera singer who performed several times at Carnegie Hall. Chase was named for his adoptive grandfather Cornelius, while the nickname Chevy was bestowed by his grandmother, derived from the medieval English Ballad of Chevy Chase. As a descendant of the Scottish Clan Douglas, the name seemed appropriate to her.

 

Chase is a 14th-generation New Yorker, and was listed in the Social Register at an early age. His mother's ancestors arrived in Manhattan starting in 1624 – among his ancestors are New York City mayors Stephanus Van Cortlandt and John Johnstone; the Schuyler family, through his ancestor Gertrude Schuyler, the wife of Stephanus Van Cortlandt; John Morin Scott, General of the New York Militia during the American Revolution; Anne Hutchinson, dissident Puritan preacher and healer; and Mayflower passengers and signers of the Mayflower Compact, John Howland, and the Pilgrim colonist leader and spiritual elder of the Plymouth Colony, William Brewster. According to his brother John:

 

Chevy once told me that people who defined themselves in terms of their ancestry were like potatoes – the best parts of them were underground. He disdained the pretension of my mother's side of the family, as embodied by her mother, Cattie.

 

As a child, Chase vacationed at Castle Hill, the Cranes' summer estate in Ipswich, Massachusetts. Chase's parents divorced when he was four; his father remarried into the Folgers coffee family, and his mother remarried twice. He has stated that he grew up in an upper middle class environment and that his adoptive maternal grandfather did not bequeath any assets to Chase's mother when he died. In a 2007 biography, Chase stated that he was physically and psychologically abused as a child by his mother and stepfather, John Cederquist. Both his parents died in 2005.

 

Schooling and music

Chase attended Riverdale Country School before being expelled. He ultimately graduated from the Stockbridge School in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. He then attended Haverford College during the 1962–63 term, where he was noted for slapstick comedy and an absurd sense of physical humor (including his signature pratfalls and "sticking forks into his orifices"). During a 2009 interview on The Today Show, he ostensibly verified the oft-publicized urban legend that he was expelled for harboring a cow in his fourth floor room, although his former roommate David Felson asserted in a 2003 interview that Chase left for academic reasons. Chase transferred to Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, where he studied a pre-med curriculum and graduated in 1967 with a BA in English.

 

Chase did not enter medical school, which meant he would be subject to the military draft. Chase was not drafted; when he appeared in January 1989 as the first guest of the just-launched late-night Pat Sajak Show, he said he had convinced his draft board he deserved a 4-F classification by "falsely claiming, among other things, that he had homosexual tendencies".

 

Chase played drums with the college band The Leather Canary, headed by school friends Walter Becker and Donald Fagen. Chase has called the group "a bad jazz band"; Becker and Fagen later founded the successful group Steely Dan. Chase has absolute pitch. He played drums and keyboards for a rock band called Chamaeleon Church, which recorded one album for MGM Records before disbanding in 1969. To give the album a more soft-rock sound, producer Alan Lorber made several alterations in the mixing, including the muting of Chase's bass drum, and Chase was reportedly incensed when he heard the final mix. Before fame, Chase worked as a cab driver, truck driver, motorcycle messenger, construction worker, waiter, busboy, fruit picker, produce manager in a supermarket, audio engineer, salesman in a wine store, and theater usher.

 

Early career

Chase was a member of an early underground comedy ensemble called Channel One which he co-founded in 1967. He also wrote a one-page spoof on Mission: Impossible for Mad Magazine in 1970 and was a writer for the short-lived Smothers Brothers TV show comeback in the spring of 1975. Chase made the move to comedy as a full-time career by 1973, when he became a cast member of The National Lampoon Radio Hour, a syndicated satirical radio series. The Lampoon Radio Hour also featured John Belushi, Gilda Radner, Bill Murray, and Brian Doyle-Murray, all of whom later became "Not-Ready-For-Prime Time Players" on NBC Saturday Night (later retitled NBC's Saturday Night and finally Saturday Night Live). Chase and Belushi also appeared in National Lampoon's off-Broadway revue Lemmings, a sketch and musical send-up of popular youth culture (in which Chase also played the drums and piano during the musical numbers). He appeared in the theatrical release The Groove Tube which was directed by another co-founder of Channel One, Ken Shapiro, and which featured several Channel One sketches.

 

Saturday Night Live

Chevy Chase at the private party after the premiere of the movie A Star is Born, December 1976

Chase was one of the original cast members of Saturday Night Live (SNL), NBC's late-night comedy television show, beginning in October 1975. During the first season, he introduced every show except one with, "Live from New York, it's Saturday Night!" The remark was often preceded by a pratfall, known as "The Fall of the Week". Chase became known for his skill at physical comedy. In one comedy sketch, he mimicked a real-life incident in which President Gerald Ford accidentally tripped while disembarking from Air Force One in Salzburg, Austria. This portrayal of President Ford as a bumbling klutz became a favorite device of Chase and helped form the popular concept of Ford as being a clumsy man. In later years, Chase met and became friendly with President Ford. Chase's physical stunts led to at least one self-injury.

 

Chase was the original anchor for the Weekend Update segment of SNL, and his catchphrase introduction, "I'm Chevy Chase... and you're not" became well known. His trademark conclusion, "Good night, and have a pleasant tomorrow" was later resurrected by Jane Curtin and Tina Fey. Chase also wrote comedy material for Weekend Update. For example, he wrote and performed "The News for the Hard of Hearing". In this skit, Chase would read the top story of the day, aided by Garrett Morris, who would repeat the story by loudly shouting it. Chase claimed that his version of Weekend Update would later be the inspiration for other mock-news shows such as The Daily Show and The Colbert Report. (Weekend Update was later revived as a segment on The Chevy Chase Show, a short-lived late-night talk-show produced by Chase and broadcast by Fox Broadcasting Company.)

 

Chase also performed in other skits on SNL including a recurring role as the Land Shark, a parody of the blockbuster movie Jaws. His racially charged "word association" skit opposite Richard Pryor from SNL's first season is frequently cited by television critics as one of the funniest (and most daring) skits in the show's history.

 

Chase was committed contractually to SNL for only one year as a writer, and became a cast member during rehearsals just before the show's premiere. He received two Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe Award for his comedy writing and live comic acting on the show. In Rolling Stone Magazine's February 2015 appraisal of all 141 SNL cast members to date, Chase was ranked tenth in overall importance. "Strange as it sounds, Chase might be the most under-rated SNL player," they wrote. "It took him only one season to define the franchise ... without that deadpan arrogance, the whole SNL style of humor would fall flat."

 

In a 1975 New York magazine cover story which called him "The funniest man in America", NBC executives referred to Chase as "The first real potential successor to Johnny Carson" and claimed he would begin guest-hosting The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson within six months of the article. Chase dismissed chatter that he could be the next Carson by telling New York, "I'd never be tied down for five years interviewing TV personalities." In fact, Chase did not even appear on the program until May 4, 1977, when he was promoting a prime time special for NBC. Carson later said of Chase; "He couldn't ad lib a fart after a baked bean dinner".

 

Chase acknowledged Ernie Kovacs' influence on his work in Saturday Night Live, and he thanked Kovacs during his acceptance speech for his Emmy award. In addition, Chase spoke of Kovacs' influence on his work in an appearance in the 1982 documentary called Ernie Kovacs: Television's Original Genius.

 

Leaving SNL

In late 1976, in the middle of the second season, Chase became the first member of the original cast to leave the show. While he landed starring roles in several films on the strength of his SNL notoriety, he asserted that the principal reason for his departure was his girlfriend Jacqueline Carlin's reluctance to move to New York. Chase moved to Los Angeles, married Carlin, and was replaced by Bill Murray, although he made a few appearances on the show during the second season.

 

Chase later hosted SNL eight times through 1997. He appeared on the show's 25th anniversary special in 1999, and was interviewed for a 2005 NBC special on the first five years of SNL. Later appearances included a Caddyshack skit featuring Bill Murray, a 1997 episode with guest host Chris Farley, as the Land Shark in a Weekend Update segment in 2001, another Weekend Update segment in 2007, and in Justin Timberlake's monologue in 2013 as a member of the Five-Timers Club, where he was reunited with his Three Amigos co-stars Steve Martin and Martin Short. He also participated in the 40th anniversary special in February 2015.

 

Film

Chase's early film roles included Tunnel Vision, the box office hit Foul Play, and Oh! Heavenly Dog. The role of Eric 'Otter' Stratton in National Lampoon's Animal House was originally written with Chase in mind, but he turned the role down to work on Foul Play. The role went to Tim Matheson instead. Chase said in an interview that he chose to do Foul Play so he could do "real acting" for the first time in his career instead of just doing "schtick". Chase followed Foul Play with the successful Harold Ramis comedy Caddyshack, in 1980. That same year, he also reunited with Foul Play co-star Goldie Hawn for Neil Simon's Seems Like Old Times and released a self-titled record album, co-produced by Chase and Tom Scott, with novelty and cover versions of songs by Randy Newman, Barry White, Bob Marley, the Beatles, Donna Summer, Tennessee Ernie Ford, The Troggs, and the Sugarhill Gang.

 

Chase narrowly escaped death by electrocution during the filming of Modern Problems in 1980. During a sequence in which Chase's character wears "landing lights" as he dreams that he is an airplane, the current in the lights short-circuited and arced through Chase's arm, back, and neck muscles. The near-death experience caused Chase to experience a period of deep depression, as his marriage to Jacqueline had ended just prior to the start of filming. Chase continued his film career in 1983's National Lampoon's Vacation, directed by Ramis and written by John Hughes. He married Jayni Luke in 1982, and in 1985, he starred in Fletch, the first of two films based on Gregory Mcdonald's Fletch books. Chase joined SNL veterans Steve Martin and Martin Short in the Lorne Michaels-produced comedy ¡Three Amigos! in 1986, declaring in an interview that making ¡Three Amigos! was the most fun he had making a film. The trio hosted SNL that year, the only time the show has had three hosts on one show.

 

At the height of his career in the late 1980s, Chase earned around US$7 million per film and was a highly visible celebrity. He appeared alongside Paul Simon, one of his best friends, in Simon's 1986 second video for "You Can Call Me Al", in which he lip-syncs all of Simon's lyrics. Chase hosted the Academy Awards in 1987 and 1988, signing on to the proceedings in 1987 with the opener, "Good evening, Hollywood phonies!" Chase filmed a sequel to Vacation, 1985's National Lampoon's European Vacation and then a third, National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, in 1989, which, thanks to its holiday theme, has become one of his more durable films, airing on NBC every December. He played saxophone onstage at Simon's free concert at the Great Lawn in Central Park in the summer of 1991. Later in 1991, he helped record and appeared in the music video "Voices That Care" to entertain and support U.S. troops involved in Operation Desert Storm, and supported the International Red Cross.

 

Later work

Chase's career took a downturn in the early 1990s. Chase had three consecutive film flops: 1991's Razzie award-nominated Nothing but Trouble, 1992's Memoirs of an Invisible Man, and 1994's Cops & Robbersons. The three releases had a combined gross of $34 million in the U.S. Even the durable Vacation series ground to a halt, following 1997's Vegas Vacation installment. Some of the more recent movies starring Chase (e.g., Vacuums, Rent-a-Husband, Goose!) have not been widely released in the United States. He returned to mainstream movie-making in 2006, co-starring with Tim Allen and Courteney Cox in the comedy Zoom, though it was both a critical and commercial failure.

 

In September 1993, Chase hosted The Chevy Chase Show, a weeknight talk show, for the Fox Broadcasting Company. Though it had high commercial expectations, the show was cancelled by Fox after only five weeks. Chase later appeared in a commercial for Doritos, airing during the Super Bowl, in which he made humorous reference to the show's failure.

 

Chase was Hasty Pudding's 1993 Man of the Year, and received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1994. After having starred with Farrah Fawcett in the relatively successful Man of the House in 1995, he received Harvard Lampoon's Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996.

 

In 1998, a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California, Walk of Stars was dedicated to him.

 

He was roasted by the Friars Club for a Comedy Central television special in 2002. This roast was noted for being unusually vitriolic. The only cast members of Saturday Night Live's first season who appeared at the roast were Laraine Newman (one of the actors on the show), Al Franken, a bit player and writer on the show and eventually a US Senator, and Paul Shaffer (a band leader on SNL in the 1970s and the host of the roast).

 

In 2005, Chase was the keynote speaker at Princeton University's Class Day, part of commencement activities.

 

On March 20, 2012, Dan Aykroyd announced through his Facebook page that he is working with Chase on a script for a new comedy that would star the two actors.

 

In 2015, Chase reprised his role as Clark Griswold in the fifth Vacation installment, simply titled Vacation. Unlike the previous four films in which Clark is the main protagonist, he only has a brief though pivotal cameo appearance. In spite of largely negative critical reception, the film itself has proven to be a financial success grossing over $104 million worldwide, making it the highest grossing entry to date.

 

Return to television

Chase guest-starred as an anti-Semitic murder suspect in "In Vino Veritas", the November 3, 2006 episode of Law & Order. He also guest-starred in the ABC drama series Brothers & Sisters in two episodes as a former love interest of Sally Field's character. Chase appeared in a prominent recurring role as villainous software magnate Ted Roark on the NBC spy-comedy Chuck. In 2009, Chase and Dan Aykroyd provided voices for the Family Guy episode "Spies Reminiscent of Us".

 

Chase starred in the NBC sitcom Community, as aging moist-towelette tycoon Pierce Hawthorne, starting in 2009. However, Chase left the show in 2012 after completing the majority of the episodes of Season 4. He returned for a cameo appearance in the Season 5 premiere. Though he had sometimes been involved in public disputes with creator Dan Harmon over the direction of the show, the role was nevertheless his most prominent in many years.

 

In 2010, he appeared in the film Hot Tub Time Machine, as well as a short online film featuring the Griswold Family, and in the Funny or Die original comedy sketch "Presidential Reunion", where he played President Ford alongside other current and former SNL president impersonators.

 

TV commercials

Chase has appeared in a number of television commercials, including Dollar Rent-a-Car (1996), Doritos (1996), History Channel (1999), a series of commercials for AAMI Insurance (Australia, 1999), Aflac (2003), Cola Turka (2003), T-Mobile (2009) and Chase Manhattan Bank (2010).

 

Personal life

Chase has three daughters: Cydney (born 1983), Caley (born 1985), and Emily (born 1988). He lives with his third wife, Jayni (née Luke), in Bedford, New York.

 

Chevy's second marriage to Jacqueline Carlin was formalized on December 4, 1976. After 17 months, his marriage to Carlin was dissolved through a divorce. During this period, Chase's daily cocaine consumption was reportedly more than two grams (0.07 oz.), and the side effects of such drug use were megalomania, paranoia, and incoherence.

 

In 1986, Chase was admitted to the Betty Ford Clinic for treatment of an addiction to prescription painkillers. His use of these drugs reportedly began after he experienced ongoing back pain related to the many pratfalls he took beginning with his Saturday Night Live appearances. In 2010, he said that his drug abuse had been "low level". He entered Minnesota's Hazelden Clinic in September 2016 for treatment of an alcohol-related issue.

 

Chase is an active environmentalist, charity fundraiser, and political liberal. He raised money and campaigned for Bill Clinton in the 1990s and John Kerry in the 2004 Presidential Election. Following the 2004 elections, Chase criticized President George W. Bush during a speech at a People For the American Way benefit at the Kennedy Center, referring to the President as an "uneducated, real lying schmuck" and a "dumb f- -k". Event organizers and several Bush detractors present at the event distanced themselves from Chase's comments, with Norman Lear remarking, "He'll live with it, I won't."

 

 

MAURICE CHEVALIER

Maurice Auguste Chevalier (September 12, 1888 – January 1, 1972) was a French actor, cabaret singer and entertainer. He is perhaps best known for his signature songs, including "Louise", "Mimi", "Valentine", and "Thank Heaven for Little Girls" and for his films, including The Love Parade and The Big Pond. His trademark attire was a boater hat, which he always wore on stage with a tuxedo.

 

Chevalier was born in Paris. He made his name as a star of musical comedy, appearing in public as a singer and dancer at an early age before working in menial jobs as a teenager. In 1909, he became the partner of the biggest female star in France at the time, Fréhel. Although their relationship was brief, she secured him his first major engagement, as a mimic and a singer in l'Alcazar in Marseille, for which he received critical acclaim by French theatre critics. In 1917, he discovered jazz and ragtime and went to London, where he found new success at the Palace Theatre.

 

After this, he toured the United States, where he met the American composers George Gershwin and Irving Berlin and brought the operetta Dédé to Broadway in 1922. He developed an interest in acting and had success in Dédé. When talkies arrived, he went to Hollywood in 1928, where he played his first American role in Innocents of Paris. In 1930, he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor for his roles in The Love Parade (1929) and The Big Pond (1930), which secured his first big American hit, "Livin' in the Sunlight, Lovin' in the Moonlight".

 

In 1957, he appeared in Love in the Afternoon, which was his first Hollywood film in more than 20 years. In 1958, he starred with Leslie Caron and Louis Jourdan in Gigi. In the early 1960s, he made eight films, including Can-Can in 1960 and Fanny the following year. In 1970, he made his final contribution to the film industry where he sang the title song of the Disney film The Aristocats. He died in Paris, on January 1, 1972, aged 83.

 

Early life

Chevalier was born in Paris, France. His father was a French house painter. His mother, Joséphine van den Bosch, was French of Belgian descent.

 

He worked a number of jobs: a carpenter's apprentice, electrician, printer, and even as a doll painter. He started in show business in 1901. He was singing, unpaid, at a café when a member of the theatre saw him and suggested he try for a local musical. He got the part. Chevalier made a name as a mimic and a singer. His act in l'Alcazar in Marseille was so successful, he made a triumphant rearrival in Paris.

 

In 1909, he became the partner of the biggest female star in France, Fréhel. However, due to her alcoholism and drug addiction, their liaison ended in 1911. Chevalier then started a relationship with 36-year-old Mistinguett at the Folies Bergère, where he was her 23-year-old dance partner; they eventually played out a public romance.

 

World War I

When World War I broke out, Chevalier was in the middle of his national service, already in the front line, where he was wounded by shrapnel in the back in the first weeks of combat and was taken as a prisoner of war in Germany for two years. In 1916, he was released through the secret intervention of Mistinguett's admirer, King Alfonso XIII of Spain, the only king of a neutral country who was related to both the British and German royal families.

 

In 1917, Chevalier became a star in le Casino de Paris and played before British soldiers and Americans. He discovered jazz and ragtime and started thinking about touring the United States. In the prison camp, he had studied English and had an advantage over other French artists. He went to London, where he found new success at the Palace Theatre, even though he still sang in French.

 

Hollywood

After the war, Chevalier went back to Paris and created several songs still known today, such as "Valentine" (1924). He played in a few pictures, including Chaplin's A Woman of Paris (a rare drama for Chaplin, in which his character of The Tramp does not appear) and made a huge impression in the operetta Dédé. He met the American composers George Gershwin and Irving Berlin and brought Dédé to Broadway in 1922. The same year he met Yvonne Vallée, a young dancer, who became his wife in 1927.

 

When Douglas Fairbanks was on honeymoon in Paris in 1920, he offered him star billing with his new wife Mary Pickford, but Chevalier doubted his own talent for silent movies (his previous ones had largely failed). When sound arrived, he made his Hollywood debut in 1928. He signed a contract with Paramount Pictures and played his first American role in Innocents of Paris. In 1930, he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor for his roles in The Love Parade (1929) and The Big Pond (1930). The Big Pond gave Chevalier his first big American hit songs: "Livin' in the Sunlight, Lovin' in the Moonlight" with words and music by Al Lewis and Al Sherman, plus "A New Kind of Love" (or "The Nightingales"). He collaborated with film director Ernst Lubitsch. He appeared in Paramount's all-star revue film Paramount on Parade (1930).

 

While Chevalier was under contract with Paramount, his name was so recognized that his passport was featured in the Marx Brothers film Monkey Business (1931). In this sequence, each brother uses Chevalier's passport, and tries to sneak off the ocean liner where they were stowaways by claiming to be the singer—with unique renditions of "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" with its line "If the nightingales could sing like you". In 1931, Chevalier starred in a musical called The Smiling Lieutenant with Claudette Colbert and Miriam Hopkins. Despite the disdain audiences held for musicals in 1931, it proved a successful film.

 

In 1932, he starred with Jeanette MacDonald in Paramount's film musical, One Hour With You which became a success and one of the films instrumental in making musicals popular again. Due to its popularity, Paramount starred Maurice Chevalier in another musical called Love Me Tonight (also 1932), and again co-starring Jeanette MacDonald. It is about a tailor who falls in love with a princess when he goes to a castle to collect a debt and is mistaken for a baron. Featuring songs by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, it was directed by Rouben Mamoulian, who, with the help of the songwriters, was able to put into the score his ideas of the integrated musical (a musical which blends songs and dialogue so the songs advance the plot). It is considered one of the greatest film musicals of all time.

 

 

In The Merry Widow (1934)

In 1934, he starred in the first sound film of the Franz Lehár operetta The Merry Widow, one of his best-known films. In 1935, he signed with MGM and returned to France later that year.

 

Even when he was the highest-paid star in Hollywood, Chevalier had a reputation as a penny-pincher. When filming at Paramount, he balked at parking his car in the Paramount lot at ten cents a day. After bargaining, he managed to get five cents per day. Another story is told of Chevalier (a smoker) having a conversation with someone who offered him a cigarette. He took it, said "Thank you", put it in his pocket, and continued with the conversation. But in Hollywood he seemed to be a divided character. When not playing around with young chorus-girls, he actually felt quite lonely, and sought the company of Adolphe Menjou and Charles Boyer, also French, but both much better educated than Chevalier. Boyer in particular introduced him to art galleries and good literature, and Chevalier would try to copy him as the man of taste. But at other times, he would 'revert to type' as the bitter and impoverished street-kid he basically was. When performing in English, he always put on a heavy French accent, although his normal spoken English was quite fluent and sounded more American.

 

In 1937, Chevalier married the dancer Nita Raya. He had several successes, such as his revue Paris en Joie in the Casino de Paris. A year later, he performed in Amours de Paris. His songs remained big hits, such as Prosper (1935), Ma Pomme (1936) and Ça fait d'excellents français (1939).

 

In 1957, Chevalier was awarded The George Eastman Award, given by George Eastman House for distinguished contribution to the art of film.

 

Maurice Chevalier (as well as French actor Charles Boyer, nicknamed "The French Lover") is also depicted in a Tex Avery cartoon.

 

World War II

During World War II, Chevalier kept performing on the stage in France. In 1941, he appeared in a successful revue in the Casino de Paris, Bonjour Paris, which was Nazi propaganda, reassuring the public that nothing had basically changed under the occupation. Songs like "Ça sent si bon la France" and "La Chanson du maçon" became hits. The Nazis knew that he was harbouring a Jewish family in the South of France, and put pressure on him to perform in Berlin and sing for the collaborating radio station Radio Paris. He refused, but did perform for prisoners of war in Germany at the same camp where he had been held captive in World War I, and succeeded in getting ten French soldiers freed in exchange.

 

In 1942 he returned to La Bocca, near Cannes, but returned to the capital city in September. In 1944 when Allied forces freed France, Chevalier was accused of collaborationism. The August 28, 1944 issue of the Stars and Stripes, the daily newspaper of U.S. Armed Forces in the European Theater of Operations, reported (in error) that "Maurice Chevalier Slain By Maquis, Patriots Say" Even though he was acquitted by a French convened court, the English-speaking press remained hostile and he was refused a visa for several years.

 

After World War II

In his own country, however, he was still popular. In 1946, he split from Nita Ray and started writing his memoirs, which took many years to complete.

 

Chevalier in 1959.

He started to paint and collect and acted in Le silence est d'or (Man About Town) (1946) by René Clair. He still toured throughout the United States and other parts of the world and returned to France in 1948.

 

In 1944, he had already participated in a Communist demonstration in Paris. He was therefore even less popular in the U.S. during the McCarthyism period; in 1951, he was refused re-entry into the U.S. because he had signed the Stockholm Appeal.

 

In 1949, he performed in Stockholm in a Communist benefit against nuclear arms. Also in 1949, Chevalier was the subject of the first official roast at the New York Friars' Club, although celebrities had been informally "roasted" at banquets since 1910.

 

In 1952, he bought a large property in Marnes-la-Coquette, near Paris, and named it "La Louque", as a homage to his mother's nickname. He started a relationship in 1952 with Janie Michels, a young divorcee with three children. In 1954, after the McCarthy era abated Chevalier was welcomed back in the United States. His first full American tour was in 1955, with Vic Schoen as arranger and musical director. The Billy Wilder film Love in the Afternoon (1957) with Audrey Hepburn and Gary Cooper was his first Hollywood film in more than 20 years.

 

Chevalier appeared in the movie musical Gigi (1958) with Leslie Caron and Hermione Gingold, with whom he shared the song "I Remember It Well", and several Walt Disney films. The success of Gigi prompted Hollywood to give him an Academy Honorary Award that year for achievements in entertainment. In 1957, he appeared as himself in an episode of The Jack Benny Program titled "Jack In Paris". He also appeared as himself in the 1958 Lucy Goes to Mexico television episode of The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour.

 

Final years

In the early 1960s, he toured the United States and between 1960 and 1963 made eight films, including Can-Can (1960) with Frank Sinatra. In 1961, he starred in the drama Fanny with Leslie Caron and Charles Boyer, an updated version of Marcel Pagnol's "Marseilles Trilogy." In 1962, he filmed Panic Button (not released until 1964), playing opposite blonde bombshell/sex symbol, Jayne Mansfield. In 1965, at 77, he made another world tour. In 1967 he toured in Latin America, again, the US, Europe and Canada. The following year, on October 1, 1968, he announced his farewell tour.

 

Historical newsreel footage of Chevalier appeared in the Marcel Ophüls documentary The Sorrow and the Pity. In a wartime short film near the end of the film's second part, he explained his disappearance during World War II (see the "World War II" section in this entry), as rumors of his death lingered at that time, and emphatically denied any collaboration with the Nazis. His theme song, "Sweepin' the Clouds Away," from the film Paramount on Parade (1930), was one of its theme songs and was played in the end credits of the film's second part.

 

In 1970, several years after his retirement, songwriters Richard M. and Robert B. Sherman got him to sing the title song of the Disney film The Aristocats, which ended up being his final contribution to the film industry.

 

He died in Paris, on New Year's Day 1972, aged 83, and was interred in the cemetery of Marnes-la-Coquette in Hauts-de-Seine, outside Paris, France.

 

Chevalier was a member of the Grand Order of Water Rats and has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1651 Vine Street.

 

TRIVIA

1.       What is the traditional beverage of the Kentucky Derby?  Bloody Mary,  Old Fashioned,  The Mint Julep,  Bellini?

2.       What was the name of the German airship that exploded over Lakehurst, New Jersey, on this day in 1937?   Lusitania,  Bismarck,  Carpathia,  Hindenburg?

3.       Mike Tyson was disqualified for biting the ear of which boxer during their fight?   Rocky Balboa,  Muhammad Ali,  Evander Holyfield,  George Foreman?

4.       In 2013, which athlete visited Kim Jong Un in North Korea calling him a "friend for life"?           Muhammad Ali,  Shaquille O'Neal,  Dennis Rodman,  Charles Barkley?

5.       Which airline is headquartered in Dallas, Texas?   Delta Air Lines,  Southwest Airlines,  United Airlines,  JetBlue Airways?

6.       Which U.S. President's disability resulted in the White House being made wheelchair-accessible?           Ulysses S. Grant,  Franklin D. Roosevelt,  Woodrow Wilson,  Harry S. Truman?

7.       Which athlete refused military service during the Vietnam War on this day in 1967?  Wilt Chamberlain,  Johnny Unitas,  Mickey Mantle,  Muhammad Ali?

8.       The term "jumping the shark" derived from which television series?  Happy Days,  The Brady Bunch,  Mork & Mindy,  Shark Tank?

9.       Which brand of soda was created for Nazi Germany during WWII?  Fanta,  Mountain Dew,  A&W Root Beer,  Mr. Pibb?

10.   What is the only state whose capital city begins with the letter “F”?   Maine, Montana, South Dakota, Kentucky?

 

 

RIM COUNTRY FISHING REPORT

By: James Goughnour

Rim Country Custom Rods

480.495.1351

 

The talk among Rim Country anglers is the first major bass fishing championship event on Roosevelt Lake. The Wild West Bass Trail Team Championship launched out of the Cholla recreational site at safe light on Thursday, May 4th. Competitors had to earn their way into this event and the field was limited to fifty teams. First day results were mixed, some anglers reported catching many fish while others could not manage to bring a limit to the scales. However, these every experienced anglers confirmed what many local anglers have been reporting recently. The bass are primarily in a late to post spawn phase. The anglers complimented the condition of Roosevelt Lake and predicted the continued recovery for the lake based on the overall health of the fish. One fish that surprised a lot of those in attendance was a 6.71 pound monster caught by Jason Blauvelt. It's been a long time since we have see a fish that large caught during a tournament. All teams will fish Day 2 of the Team Championship. After that, the field will be cut to the top 10 teams who will fish on "Championship Saturday. " The final day weigh-in can be watched live at Green Valley Park in Payson. The entertainment will begin at 2 PM and the weigh-in will begin at 4 PM. For a team event, the fish limit is seven fish for two anglers. The top 5 Day 1 results:

 

1. Davis Hart - Jason Blauvelt 18.39 lbs

2. Tai Au - Russell Mortensen 16.87 lbs

3. Roy Hawk - Mark White 15.57 lbs

4. Dylan Maxon - Zack Holwerda 14.93 lbs

5. Shane Moline - Todd Herman 14.86 lbs.

 

Follow the Wild West Bass Trail live weigh-ins at www. wildwestbasstrail.com. Also available is a replay of the Day 1 weigh-in.

 

The crappie spawn continues on Roosevelt Lake, however, the water conditions have changed. With the sudden higher ambient temperatures, algae blooms are present in a lot of areas of the lake, especially in the shallow waters where crappie are spawning. This is frustrating some crappie anglers, however if it enhances the success of the spawn, crappie anglers will be very happy in a year or two.

 

Trout fishing in Rim Country streams is excellent. The AZGFD spring trout stocking program is underway. Nearly all Rim Country trout streams being stocked weekly near easy access parking and pull-off areas along the streams. Experienced fly anglers are recommending Christopher Creek, Canyon Creek, East Verde, Haigler and  Tonto Creeks. Power-bait using a small trebled hook can almost guarantee a limit of trout.  

 

Have a great week of fishing and I hope to see you on the water.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT’S COOKIN’?

Five-Ingredient Rhubarb Squares

 

 

Ingredients

1    box Betty Crocker™ SuperMoist™ yellow cake mix

3/4    cup cold butter or margarine, cut into small pieces

1 3/4    cups sugar

3    eggs

4    cups sliced fresh rhubarb

    Whipped cream, if desired

 

Steps

1         Heat oven to 350°F (325°F for dark or nonstick pan). Reserve 2 tablespoons of the cake mix. In large bowl, cut butter into remaining cake mix, using pastry blender (or pulling 2 table knives through ingredients in opposite directions), until crumbly. In bottom of ungreased 13x9-inch pan, pat 2 cups of the mixture. Reserve remaining crumbly mixture for topping. Bake 13 minutes.

2          In large bowl, beat reserved 2 tablespoons cake mix, the sugar and eggs with electric mixer on medium speed until creamy. Stir in rhubarb. Pour over partially baked crust. Sprinkle remaining crumbly mixture over top.

3         Bake 45 to 50 minutes longer or until golden brown and center is set. Cool slightly before serving.

4         Serve warm or cold with whipped cream. Store covered in refrigerator.

 

 

Strawberry-Rhubarb Angel Cake

 

 

Flavor combinations such as strawberry and rhubarb are classics for a reason--they taste great together! Enjoy them both in this elegant lay

 

 

Ingredients

Cake

 

1    box Betty Crocker™ white angel food cake mix

1 1/4    cups cold water

2    teaspoons grated orange peel

 

Filling

2    cups sliced rhubarb

1/2    cup granulated sugar

2    tablespoons orange juice Save $

1 1/2    cups sliced strawberries

Red food color, if desired

 

Frosting

1 1/2    cups whipping (heavy) cream

3    tablespoons granulated or powdered sugar

1    container (15 oz) ricotta cheese

1/4    cup powdered sugar

 

Garnish

1/2    cup sliced strawberries

 

Steps

1         Move oven rack to lowest position (remove other racks). Heat oven to 350°F. In extra-large glass or metal bowl, beat cake mix, water and orange peel with electric mixer on low speed 30 seconds; beat on medium speed 1 minute. Pour into ungreased 10-inch angel food (tube) cake pan. (Do not use fluted tube cake pan or 9-inch angel food pan or batter will overflow.)

2          Bake 37 to 47 minutes or until top is dark golden brown and cracks feel very dry and not sticky. Do not underbake. Immediately turn pan upside down onto glass bottle until cake is completely cool, about 2 hours.

3         Meanwhile, in 2-quart saucepan, mix rhubarb, 1/2 cup granulated sugar and the orange juice. Cook over medium heat 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Cool 15 minutes. Stir in 1 1/2 cups strawberries. Stir in 4 drops food color if deeper red color is desired. Refrigerate about 1 hour.

4         In chilled medium bowl, beat whipping cream and 3 tablespoons sugar on high speed until soft peaks form. In large bowl, beat ricotta cheese and 1/4 cup powdered sugar on medium speed until fluffy. Fold in whipped cream.

5         Run knife around edges of cake; remove from pan. Cut cake horizontally to make 3 layers. Fill layers with filling. Frost side and top of cake with frosting. Arrange 1/2 cup strawberries over top of cake. Store covered in refrigerator.

 

Strawberry Tropics Cake

 

 

Warm up to a taste of the tropics! The flavors of this cool cake are reminiscent of strawberry daiquiris and piña coladas.

 

 

 

Ingredients

1    box Betty Crocker™ SuperMoist™ strawberry cake mix

1    can (8 oz) crushed pineapple in juice, well drained and juice reserved

1/2    cup water

1/3    vegetable oil

3    eggs

2    teaspoons grated orange peel

1    container Betty Crocker™ Whipped fluffy white frosting or Betty Crocker™ Rich & Creamy vanilla frosting

1/4    cup flaked coconut

2    teaspoons grated orange peel

Additional flaked coconut and fresh strawberries, if desired

 

Steps

1         Heat oven to 350°F (325°F for dark or nonstick pan). Grease or spray bottom only of 13x9-inch pan.

2         In large bowl, beat cake mix, reserved pineapple juice, water, oil and eggs on low speed 2 minutes, scraping bowl occasionally (do not overbeat); stir in 2 teaspoons orange peel. Pour into pan.

3         Bake as directed on box for 13x9-inch pan. Run knife around sides of pan to loosen cake. Cool completely, about 1 hour.

4         In medium bowl, stir together frosting, pineapple, 1/4 cup coconut and 2 teaspoons orange peel. Spread frosting mixture over top of cake. Garnish with additional coconut and strawberries. Store loosely covered.

 

 TRIVIA ANSWERS

1.       Answer: The Mint Julep has been the traditional beverage of the Kentucky Derby for nearly a century. Today, the julep is embedded in Derby ceremony itself: at the Winner's Party, the governor of Kentucky toasts to the victor with a sterling silver julep cup. Each year, almost 120,000 Mint Juleps are served over the two-day period of Kentucky Oaks and Kentucky Derby weekend at Churchill Downs Racetrack. That’s a feat that requires more than 10,000 bottles of Old Forester Mint Julep Ready-to-Serve Cocktail, 1,000 pounds of freshly harvested mint and 60,000 pounds of ice.

2.       Answer: On May 6, 1937, the German airship Hindenburg burst into flames while attempting to land at Lakehurst, New Jersey. The disaster killed 35 people on the airship, and one member of the ground crew, but miraculously 62 of the 97 passengers and crew survived. The disaster was caused by an electrostatic discharge (i.e., a spark) that ignited leaking hydrogen. The incident shattered public confidence in the giant, passenger-carrying rigid airship and marked the abrupt end of the airship era.

3.       Answer: On June 28, 1997, in one of the most controversial events in modern sports, Mike Tyson was disqualified for biting Evander Holyfield on both ears. The first time he bit him the match was temporarily stopped. Referee Mills Lane deducted two points from Tyson and the fight resumed. However, after the match resumed, Tyson did it again: this time Tyson was disqualified and Holyfield won the match. One bite was severe enough to remove a piece of Holyfield's right ear, which was found on the ring floor after the fight.

4.       Answer: Dennis Rodman is considered one of basketball's all-time great rebounders and known for his outlandish behavior both on and off the court. In 2013, Rodman traveled to North Korea and met with the country's leader, Kim Jong Un. The two share a love of basketball, and Rodman watched a game with Kim during his visit. He later said Kim was "a friend for life” and that Kim was "awesome" and "so honest." The former pro basketball player also expressed in an interest in returning to North Korea to help facilitate peace between the U.S. and North Korea.

5.       Answer: Southwest Airlines is the world's largest low-cost carrier, headquartered in Dallas, Texas. In 1966 Southwest Airlines was founded by Rollin King and Herbert Kelleher; in 1967 it was incorporated as Air Southwest Company. It was not until 1971 that the airline began scheduled flights, from Dallas Love Field. The same year the organization adopted the name Southwest Airlines. The expansion of flights started in 1975, to cities throughout Texas, and in 1978 Southwest began flying to neighboring states. Service to the East and the Southeast started in the 1990s

6.       Answer: The White House did not become wheelchair accessible until Franklin Delano Roosevelt took office in 1933. President Roosevelt suffered paralysis due to polio, so the White House was remodeled to accommodate his wheelchair. Franklin Roosevelt also added a heated indoor swimming pool to help with his therapy. He later established a foundation at Warm Springs, Georgia where he founded a hydrotherapy center for the treatment of polio patients, and founded the March of Dimes that eventually funded an effective polio vaccine.

7.       Answer: On April 28, 1967, boxing champion Muhammad Ali refused to be inducted into the U.S. Army and was immediately stripped of his heavyweight title. Ali cited religious reasons for his decision to forgo military service. With the United States at war in Vietnam, Ali refused to be inducted into the armed forces, saying “I ain’t got no quarrel with those Vietcong.” Ali was convicted of draft evasion, sentenced to five years in prison, fined $10,000 and banned from boxing for three years. He stayed out of prison as his case was appealed.

8.       Answer: The phrase “jumping the shark” is based on a scene from a fifth-season episode of the sitcom Happy Days in which the character Fonzie jumps over a shark while on water-skis. This television moment has since become a Hollywood symbol of when screenwriting has deteriorated into absurdity. The show continued for a further seven years, but it’s widely accepted that this was the moment it began to derail from a quality standpoint. This shark stunt moment has also become a cultural symbol of when quality takes a dramatic downturn for the worse.

9.       Answer: Fanta was invented in Nazi Germany during World War II due to a trade embargo on importing Coca-Cola syrup. The head of Coca-Cola Deutschland decided to create a new product for the German market during the war, using ingredients available in Germany at the time, including whey and apple pomace. They held a competition to name the new orange soda, saying “use your imagination”; the German translation of ‘imagination’, is ‘fantasie’ and in that moment a German salesman, Joe Knipp came up with the name Fanta.

10.   Answer: Frankfort is the capital city of Kentucky. With a population of 25,527 at the 2010 census, it is the fifth-smallest state capital in the United States. The town of Frankfort likely received its name from an event that took place in the 1780s. American Indians attacked a group of early European-American pioneers from Bryan Station, who were making salt at a ford in the Kentucky River. Pioneer Stephen Frank was killed, and the settlers thereafter called the crossing "Frank's Ford." This name was later elided to Frankfort.